The better the nutrition and the lesser the stress, the slimmer the chances of getting sick. But when you do find yourself sick, better yet the minute you get that feeling of not being yourself, coming down with “something”, getting a little hoarseness or soreness in your throat, a heavier than usual pressure on your chest, a runny nose, little chills, a slightly elevated temperature or a little weakness in your knees and arms, it’s time to act.

With an average person catching cold 2-3 times per year, and more for children, it is good to act proactively and prepare for the cold season in advance so that you can run home putting yourself under the covers instead of running to multiple stores searching for right supplements or ingredients.

You can help reduce your risk of getting a cold by washing your hands often, avoiding close contact with sick people who spread viruses faster, and by not touching your face with unwashed hands.

Many people live alone or are caretakers for others and don’t have the luxury of being taken care of by others. Foreseeing getting sick once or twice within the season can put you at better odds of getting better faster, missing less work and enjoying the fall and winter instead of dreading it. With an average recovery time from colds of 7-10 days, it really pays off to be proactive.

Centre for Disease Control and Prevention warn that antibiotics do not help you recover from a cold caused by viruses and may make it harder for your body to fight future bacterial infections if you take them unnecessarily.

Ideal Cold buster Diet consists of small amounts of hot fluids helping to warm the bottom of nasal pharynx and help improve symptoms and non-processed, easily digested foods. That means no cold water, pasteurized orange juice straight from the fridge, mucus forming cow’s milk, eggs, butter, sugar and meat and includes plenty of rest so that the body can do what it’s equipped to do, focus on healing.

A bowl of Tender Loving Care – Traditional Bone Broth or vegetable based Mineral Broth

Full of nutrients and warming aromatic spices is a great way of feeding yourself without putting burden on the digestive system and during the times of lost appetite. While studies still need to prove the effectiveness of bone broth in fighting colds one study published in Chest Journal, a publication of the American College of Chest Physicians, hot bone broth soup was more effective than hot water in stimulating something known as the mucociliary transport system, important for getting rid of every respiratory infection, including colds helping move things along in the upper and lower respiratory tract, allowing the body to rid itself of particles and infection.

Bone Broth/ Ramen/Pho
Organic, grass fed beef, lamb, chicken or veal bones
4 quarts of water (4 liters)
1 celery root, peeled and cut into cubes or 4 celery stalks
3-4 parsley roots, peeled and cut into cubes
3-4 carrots, peeled and cut into cubes
2 onions, peeled and cut into cubes
1 leek, washed well and sliced in half
10 peppercorns
5 cardamom pods
Sea salt to taste
4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 Bay leaves
6 cloves
2 teaspoons turmeric
1 whole garlic bulb sliced in half
3-5 Dates
2 tbsp goji berries
ginger

Simmer in large pot for 12-24 hours preferably using a slow cooker, skimming the surface of any foam that appears after the soup comes to boil.
Strain, adjust seasonings and pour hot in the mason jars leaving two inches off the top. Close the lids tightly allowing jars to cool off on the kitchen counter. Place in the fridge. You may also use BPA free plastic bags for freezing cold broth as it’s more convenient to defrost. To defrost, simply place the bag in warm (not hot) water till it can easily come out onto the pot.

Mineral Vegetable Broth
Similar ingredients to bone broth except it has no bones and may include a piece of kombu seaweed for mineral content, extra virgin olive oil and optional quarter of a cabbage.

2 quarts of water (2 liters)
1 celery root, peeled and cut into cubes or 4 celery stalks
3-4 parsley roots, peeled and cut into cubes
3-4 carrots, peeled and cut into cubes
2 onions, peeled and cut into cubes
1 leek, washed well and sliced in half
10 peppercorns
5 cardamom pods
Sea salt to taste
1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 piece of Kombu (optional)
¼ of a small cabbage (optional)
2 Bay leaves
6 cloves
2 teaspoons turmeric
1 whole garlic bulb sliced in half

Simmer covered for 1 hour. Adjust the taste. Proceed as above with storage and freezing.

Hot herbal teas

•Small piece of ginger root sliced and simmered in in hot water for 20 minutes. Ginger is known as a natural antibiotic.
•Peppermint tea to help breathe better.
•Raspberry tea to induce sweating, which helps fight fever.

Worth having in your medicine cabinet

•Oil of oregano – consult your doctor before taking few drops of this strong oil especially for those taking anticoagulant/antiplatelet drugs
•Vitamin C
•Singer’s Throat spray if you are losing your voice or have irritation.
•Elderberry Syrup for coughs and cold.
•Sitopladi Churna – classic Ayurvedic  formula for a healthy respiratory tract is a combination of herbs which consists of cane sugar, a type of bamboo called banslochan, long pepper or pippali fruit, cardamom seed and cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia).
•Trikatu – A pungent Ayurvedic combination of ginger, long pepper and black pepper helping to balance mucus production, while boosting natural respiratory defenses. Best taken on a spoonful of honey with cinnamon.

This Winter season stay proactive by improving your overall diet and lifestyle and learning how to rest and recover from high stress and keep well stocked for the times you do come down with something, reducing the ill time.

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